How to Identify Emerging Real Estate Markets

If you are interested in making a career out of real estate investment, it is important to have the ability to spot emerging markets before they reach their full potential. This allows you to get in early and support the growth of the market, while also ensuring that you are in a position to make as much money as possible form your initial investment.
Of course, that sounds far easier than it actually is, as it is not always easy to see where the next market is going to emerge and it can often be difficult to get all of the pieces of the puzzle to align so that you can take advantage of it.
Here we will look at a few tips that will serve you well when you are considering your investments.
Take Away Personal Taste
If you are looking to invest in property, the first thing that you need to do is take away your own personal tastes. After all, the property isn't intended for your own use, so what you think about it is actually not all that much of an issue.
Instead, try to consider how the property fits into the surrounding area and if there is going to be a demand for what it has to offer. Cheap apartments, for example, may not be to your personal taste but they may well serve a purpose to the area in which they are being built. Put your business head on and try to see the big picture in terms of how the market looks in a particular area.
Get In Early
The term "emerging" is important to consider here, as your investment will be worth less if you jump on a bandwagon that is already well-established. Keep your eyes open for news of potential investments and try to get on board at the earliest possible stage, so that you can reap the largest rewards at a later date.
Of course, this doesn't just mean that you should invest in everything that is just starting up. Consider the reputations of the people behind the project and their previous successes. Be sure to meet with them to discuss their plans and the research they have put into the project, and be very wary of anybody who is not willing to speak to you directly but still wants you to invest in their venture.
Know The Local Market
The property market is extremely complex, with national cycles not always matching up to the way that the market is going in various localities. As such it is extremely important that you do the research into any area that you are looking to invest in and, just as importantly, you keep on top of the changes in that market that are always bound to happen.
Simply put, you are not going to make any money if you invest in a project where there is no demand. Find out if the area is a renter's market, or a comfortable place for people to purchase a first home and look for upcoming projects that will satisfy that demand.

What Does a Real Estate Consultant Do?

You may be wondering if the title of real estate consultant is a meaningful one, and if it indicates anything different from the same old licensed real estate brokers with a vested interest in the fate of a property. While it is true that anyone can call himself or herself a consultant, the term is not meaningless window dressing. For those who take their real estate consulting business seriously, it represents a different model, a different approach to real estate practice.
The first and most important difference is objectivity. Whereas a real estate broker typically is paid contingent on an outcome-in other words, they receive a commission-a real estate consultant is paid solely for their expertise. They have no stake in the outcome. Salespeople are paid only for getting a result-a sale. Real estate consultants are paid for their expert advice only, and by design have no stake in achieving a particular outcome to a particular transaction. This gives them the capacity to be more objective and inherently more trustworthy than a traditional real estate salesperson. Think about it-even the most honest salesperson will unconsciously try to steer you toward a sale. After all, that's where their pay comes from-from selling! The consultant is paid the way other professional advisors or service professionals like CPAs are, with a retainer regardless of outcome.
Consulting can involve a variety of skills and areas of expertise. You can hire a consultant for legal advice, market research, or to locate possible properties to invest in, among other things. Since they are paid as much for their time if they advise you that there are no properties in an area worth investing in as if they advise you of dozens of viable properties, they have no stake in anything except giving you the best advice possible. After all, their future business depends on word-of-mouth endorsements from investors like you.
If you are looking for properties to invest in, a real estate consultant can tip you off to developer closeouts and bulk opportunities, equity partnerships, joint ventures, and possibly even some very unique and profitable turnkey investment opportunities. The consultant is selling information and expertise, and therefore can provide you with a layer of insulation between you and the people selling the properties. They can work out a lot of the details and business prospects of a property before you have to talk to a salesperson. Once you face the salesperson, you can approach the negotiation fully armed with an array of appropriate information, and thus avoid being bamboozled and negotiate from a position of strength.
If, on the other hand, you are selling properties, especially if you have a lot of properties to sell, a real estate consultant can help you create a strategy to sell the units before you get involved with actual salespeople, which can have many advantages. For example, you can sell a lot of properties in a relatively short time without creating the appearance of a bulk sale by having a real estate consultant distribute the properties among several different sellers.

Forensic Pathology Vs Forensic Anthropology

Pathology, compared to forensic pathology, refers to a specialized field of medicine that is focused on the study of diseases. This is a method of studying conducted through an autopsy. By adding the word forensics to its name, the whole concept changes and you basically have that branch of pathology that determines the cause of death of a corpse through an autopsy that is made at the request of a medical examiner or coroner. That is forensic pathology.

There are many roles that forensics pathologists have. These include determining the cause of death, identifying the presence or absence of disease using tissue samples, forensic examination of the body, collaborative collection of evidence such as blood and hair samples and then passed on to toxicologists for analysis, acting as an expert witness in court cases, examining post mortem injuries and wounds, and collaborate investigations with forensic odontologists and physical anthropologists for body identification. All of these are performed in a painstaking and meticulous manner with zero percent error. Overall, the major component of forensic pathology is in the conduct of making autopsy examinations to both the internal and external organs in order to discover the cause of death. Tissue samples are taken from the bodies and studied under a microscope to establish the underlying pathological basis for the death.

One of the fields of specialized study that closely works with forensic pathology is forensic anthropology. Contrary to the former, forensic anthropology is the process of investigating what takes place with human remains that have been decomposed beyond recognition or scrapped of any remaining DNA.

Forensic anthropologists differ from forensic pathologist in that the latter is someone who focuses on the soft tissues of the body remains in order to conduct autopsies and determine cause of death. For this field, cause of death should be accurate as to whether it was because of suicide, by accident, of natural causes and the like. Although regular medical doctors can conduct these autopsies, a forensic pathologist has more training and experience in pathological issues and have specialized training in the field of forensic pathology.

Undergraduate courses in the field of forensic pathology already cover the whole range of anthropology in general with a few linguistic courses added. Masters and PhD programs are supplemented with more work and research. The postgraduate education for the application and techniques that are used in forensic pathology can already be obtained at the PhD level or while studying the Masters Degree.

What Are the Biggest Issues Facing Forensic Accountants

Whether it is for the purposes of business valuation or other analysis of complicated data, an accountant can play an important role in identifying problems and establishing new protocol going forward. The forensic accountant will usually combine fiscal and legal skills in determining the presence of a crime or/and identifying those factors that should be considered in a business valuation. This role is increasingly more valuable since economic difficulties in 2008 have caused many businesses to analyze their activities much more closely in light of potential fraud. Since 2008, there have been key changes in crime and the way that the FBI and other government authorities pursue fraud.

The FBI, for example, created positions in this field within their own department and currently 15% of staff are specialists working on issues such valuation of companies and calculation of damages. Playing the role of forensic accountant can be a critical one as it will impact many individuals whether in a business valuation or a fraud sense. Perception is a key issue that forensic accountants face.

Although many clients could see forensics as just another accountant, there is a large difference in skillset between ensuring compliance to traditional practices and reconstructing the suspicious. Complexity and time management are also key issues for today's forensic accountants. Records tend to be immense even when they are organized digitally, and activity can extend across multiple jurisdictions. The timing of using a forensic accountant could also demand rapid and intense actions that constrain relationships with existing clients. If you are in the process of valuing a business or attempting to determine something that requires analysis of a lot of data, a forensic accountant may be just the person you need.

One of the most common times to bring in a forensic accountant is when a business needs valued. During a divorce, both parties may be highly interested in the valuation of a business because it can have a significant impact on the division of property. This is why it's imperative to have someone who has worked on business valuations before. With so much at stake, it requires the accounting and investigative skills of someone who knows how to dig into complex data and present a clear result. Not taking this seriously could lead to an incorrect valuation, which has many unfortunate impacts. Make sure you've fully vetted the forensic accountant you plan to hire before signing on the dotted line.

The Myth and the Truth of the IP Address Tracing

Many people are under the misconception that it's easy to trace the physical location of the computer to which an internet IP address has been assigned and thereby identify the computer's user.

It's certainly not easy and depending on who you are it may not even be possible.

An IP or "Internet Protocol" address is the unique number assigned to every device such as a computer on a network so that data can be routed to and from that device and no other. Much like your postal mailing address identifies the physical location of your post box and allows your mail carrier to know where to deliver your mail, a device's IP address is what allows the internet to know where to send the data destined for your computer.

But while an IP address is like a physical address it's important to realize that's not what it actually is.

IP addresses are assigned not based on where you are, but based on where you get your internet connectivity. The IP address that might be assigned to your computer at home might be radically different than the one assigned to your neighbor's computer next door if you use different ISPs. Even if you used the same ISP there are no rules or practices that would make your IP addresses necessarily appear "close" to one another in any sense, other than the convenience of the ISP.

And yet somehow television and movie dramas would have us believe that given just an IP address a criminal can be located in minutes.

It's nowhere near that easy.

Publicly available information about an IP address will tell you which ISP is providing that address, and not much else. Some additional information may be available that indicates the general area that an IP address might reside, but that can be as general as telling you only what country it's in, or perhaps what city but rarely, if ever, anything more specific. Services that claim to be able to pinpoint the location of a specific IP address using only publicly available information are misleading at best.

The ISP holds the key. The ISP that "owns" the IP address that is assigned to your computer also knows where you live. It's there that they send your bill or hook up the wires. If you're on dial-up, then in conjunction with the telephone company they know which phone line you're using to dial in, and once again the phone company knows where that line terminates.

Most ISPs adhere to a strict privacy policy that prevents them from disclosing that information to just anyone. That's why on your own you may be able to identify the ISP involved and nothing more.

You'll need help.

This is where the legal system enters into the picture. Police and the courts can, with appropriate cause, request or even demand that the information be provided. Most typically that implies that the law enforcement professionals go to a judge, provide evidence that there is reasonable cause to believe a crime as been committed, at which point the judge issues a court order compelling the ISP to release the information.

If there's nothing to suggest that a crime has been committed then in theory even law enforcement cannot get the information.

This puts those who are perhaps being victimized by cyberbullying and other online harassment at a disadvantage. It means that as long as the the activity stays "legal", then there's little that can be done to trace the offender. Fortunately many locations are putting into place laws that more directly address these situations and which law enforcement can use to trace the offenders.

While it's certainly important that IP based location information be available when needed, your privacy is also an important concern. Since your computer's IP address is easily available whenever you use the internet you don't want someone to randomly locate you by using it.

ISPs and service providers are important gatekeepers of that privacy.

The truth is that yes, an IP address does in fact uniquely identify a computer connection to the internet, and that information can be used to determine a physical location. However the myth is that it's easy, and it's not. Important privacy practices prevent that level of detail from being available to the general public; ISPs, service providers and typically law enforcement must be involved.